piles of bills

UPDATE: New report shows success of No Surprises Act: patient protections against unfair medical bills

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Patricia Kelmar
Director, Health Care Campaigns

Author: Patricia Kelmar

Director, Health Care Campaigns

 

Started on staff: 1986-1991; 2020
B.A., magna cum laude, Boston College; J.D., high honors, George Washington University Law School

Patricia directs the health care campaign work for U.S. PIRG and provides support to our state offices for state-based health initiatives. Her prior roles include senior director of health policy with the National Consumers League, senior policy advisor at NJ Health Care Quality Institute, and consumer advocate at NJPIRG. She serves on the board of the Patient and Caregiver Engagement Advisory Group for the National Quality Forum. Patricia enjoys walks along the Potomac and sharing her love of books with her friends and family around the world.

Sometimes it’s hard to measure success when what you are tracking is something that doesn’t happen. Beginning in January, the No Surprises Act made it illegal for most out-of-network doctors, hospitals and air ambulances to send a surprise medical bill. A new study showed at least 600,000 bills submitted by providers in just the first two months of the new law were subject to this prohibition. That means thousands of patients who would have received those unfair and expensive surprise bills have saved hundreds to thousands of dollars, thanks to the new law. And if this trend continues, it could mean more than 12 million bills will be avoided in 2022, amounting to tens of millions of dollars back in the hands of the patients. That’s what success looks like. Do you know your rights under the No Surprises Act. If not, learn more with our Patient Guide: Surprise medical billing protections you can use now

Photo credit: Sharon McCutcheon on Unsplash

Patricia Kelmar
Director, Health Care Campaigns

Author: Patricia Kelmar

Director, Health Care Campaigns

 

Started on staff: 1986-1991; 2020
B.A., magna cum laude, Boston College; J.D., high honors, George Washington University Law School

Patricia directs the health care campaign work for U.S. PIRG and provides support to our state offices for state-based health initiatives. Her prior roles include senior director of health policy with the National Consumers League, senior policy advisor at NJ Health Care Quality Institute, and consumer advocate at NJPIRG. She serves on the board of the Patient and Caregiver Engagement Advisory Group for the National Quality Forum. Patricia enjoys walks along the Potomac and sharing her love of books with her friends and family around the world.